SAVAGE
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"…the ways in which she spied on people taking selfies in front of it…"
Kara Walker is a Trickster. (via jmjafrx)
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current mood
Sacred Sexuality: For Women Who Are Intimate With Women
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WHEN YOU GO ON THE NON-ACADEMIC JOB MARKET:
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rhomeporium:

A mother’s worst nightmare.
rhomeporium:

A mother’s worst nightmare.
rhomeporium:

A mother’s worst nightmare.
rhomeporium:

A mother’s worst nightmare.
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"#HATERS GONNA MAKE SOME PRETTY GOOD POINTS ACTUALLY"
novazembla (via lowendtheory)
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"Like much prison abolition work, the call for this anthology comes from frustration and hope: frustration with organizers against sexual assault and domestic violence who treat the police as a universally available and as a good solution; frustration with prison abolitionists who only use “domestic violence” and “rape” as provocative examples; and, frustration with academic discussions that use only distanced third-person case studies and statistics to talk about sexual violence and the Prison Industrial Complex (PIC). But, this project also shares the hope and worth of working toward building communities without prisons and without sexual violence. Most importantly, it is anchored in the belief that resisting prisons, domestic violence, and sexual assault are inseparable."

Anthology Call for Submissions • Survivors in Solidarity with Prison Abolition

I’ve written a little bit previously that I hope provides a few strategies for being in solidarity as a survivor, so I’m really glad this is happening on a larger and more intentional scale.  Please pass on.

(via lowendtheory)
Just tweeted it; might as well post it.
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"It is necessary to question the presence of people in color in the academy as an unquestioned good. Does tenuring more native or ethnic studies scholars necessarily contribute to a decolonized academy, or does it serve to further retrench a colonial academic system by multiculturalizing it? Does our position in the academy help our communities or does it enable us to engage in what Cathy Cohen describes as a process of secondary marginalization, creating an elite class that can oppress and police the rest of the members of our communities? Have we fallen into the trap Elizabeth Povinelli describes of simply adding social difference to the multicultural academy without social consequence? Does our presence help challenge the political and economic status quo, or does our presence serve as an alibi for the status quo? In asking these questions, I do not suggest that there is politically pure space from which to work outside the academic-industrial complex, and yet still constitute a subversion that matters. However, it is an imperative to ensure our opposition within the academy is more contestatory and less complicit."
Andrea Smith, ‘Native Studies and Critical Pedagogy : Beyond the Academic-Industrial Complex’   (via vidrieras)